July Immigration News & Updates

TEMPORARY PROTECTED STATUS REINSTATED FOR EL SALVADOR, HONDURAS, NEPAL, AND NICARAGUA

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced plans to reinstate Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for El Salvador, Honduras, Nepal, and Nicaragua and extend TPS designations for all four countries for 18 months. This is not an opportunity for new applicants to apply.

El Salvador: The TPS extension will be from Sept. 10, 2023, through March 9, 2025. Eligibility is for beneficiaries under El Salvador's existing designation or Salvadoran nationals (including stateless individuals who last lived in El Salvador) continuously residing in the U.S. since Feb. 13, 2001. The deadline to re-register is September 10, 2023.

Honduras: The TPS extension will be from Jan. 6, 2024, through July 5, 2025. Individuals who last lived in Honduras) continuously residing in the U.S. since Dec. 30, 1998. The 60-day re-registration period will be from Nov. 6, 2023, through Jan. 5, 2024.

Nepal: The TPS extension will be from Dec. 25, 2023, through June 24, 2025. Eligibility is for beneficiaries under Nepal's existing designation or Nepali nationals (including stateless individuals who last lived in Nepal) continuously residing in the U.S. since June 24, 2015. The 60-day re-registration period will be from Oct. 24, 2023, through Dec. 23, 2023.

Nicaragua: The TPS extension will be from Jan. 6, 2024, through July 5, 2025. Eligibility is for beneficiaries under Nicaragua's existing designation or Nicaraguan nationals (including stateless individuals who last lived in Nicaragua) continuously residing in the U.S. since Dec. 30, 1998. The 60-day re-registration period will be from Nov. 6, 2023, through Jan. 5, 2024.

We will keep you informed about any further updates. If you or someone you know is affected by these changes, follow the re-registration process outlined on the uscis.gov website or contact or office.

NEW FAMILY REUNIFICATION PAROLE PROCESS FOR COLUMBIA, EL SALVADOR, GUATEMALA, AND HONDURAS

To address the dangerous and irregular migration across the Western Hemisphere, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced the implementation of new Family Reunification Parole (FRP) processes for Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. These processes aim to allow vetted beneficiaries of an approved Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, to be temporarily paroled into the United States on a case-by-case basis. Individuals who do not have approved family-based petitions are not eligible to apply.

How the Process Works

U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents with an approved Form I-130 can initiate the process by filing Form I-134A, an Online Request to be a Supporter and a Declaration of Financial Support if they receive an invitation from the Department of State. This step must occur for advance authorization to travel and parole into the United States.

Key Points to Remember

Discretionary Basis: Beneficiaries under these processes will be considered for parole on a case-by-case basis, and the decision will be made at the authorities' discretion. To qualify, they must demonstrate urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit and warrant a favorable exercise of discretion.

Parole Duration: If approved, beneficiaries will generally be paroled into the United States for up to three years. They will also be eligible to apply for employment authorization for their parole period.

Invitations and Updates: Invitations for certain U.S. citizens or lawful permanent resident petitioners with an approved Form 1-130 have yet to be issued. More updates on the FRP processes for Cuba and Haiti will be announced soon.

Stay tuned for further updates on immigration news.

 

DEFERRED ACTION AND PAROLE IN PLACE FOR VICTIMS AND/OR WITNESSES OF LABOR VIOLATIONS

The Biden Administration has announced that it will grant, on a case-by-case basis, Deferred Action or Parole in Place to victims or witnesses of labor law violations. Victims or witnesses must first obtain a Letter of Support from one of various local, state, or federal agencies charged with investigating workplace abuses. These agencies could include the Department of Labor, the National Labor Relations Board, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, or the California Labor Commissioner. Such an agency would have to verify that the applicant has an ongoing labor dispute, and also indicate their interest in continued cooperation from the victim or witness in order to investigate the dispute. If approved, the victim will receive protection from deportation, work authorization, and potentially an avenue to obtain legal status.

Such victims or witnesses are recommended to contact an employment lawyer or workers' rights organization to work together to pursue the labor dispute and then contact our office to explore possible immigration benefits.

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