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dacasourcecitedOn January 19, 2016, The Supreme Court announced that it will hear the case regarding the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) and the expansion of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) announced by President Obama in 2014. The Supreme Court will most likely hear oral arguments in March or April of this year and may reach a decision at the end of June 2016.

On November 20, 2014, President Obama announced the executive actions. As a result of a lawsuit filed by the State of Texas and 25 other states, on February 25, 2015, a federal court in Texas preliminarily blocked the program from going forward the day before it would go into effect. Since then, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is prohibited from implementing the programs.

USCIS is not accepting DAPA applications or applications for those eligible for the expanded DACA at this time. If the Supreme Court finds that DAPA and the expanded DACA are unconstitutional, USCIS will most likely not start processing DAPA and expanded DACA applications until the end of 2016.

As with previous immigration opportunities, many notaries, counselors and others who take advantage of vulnerable individuals by collecting significant amounts of money for DAPA/DACA expansion applications that are not being processed by USCIS at this time. Please be careful. To find more information about avoiding immigration scams click here for the USCIS website link.

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